Why 99-Year-Old Lillian Weber Is Not Retired

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Why 99-Year-Old Lillian Weber Is Not Retired

She has no plans of retiring anytime soon. Matter of fact, by May 6, 2015, when she’ll celebrate her 100th birthday, Lillian Weber hopes to have sewn and donated her 1,000th handmade dress for young girls in Africa. 

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Lillian begins a new dress every morning at her home in the small town of Bettendorf, Iowa, to benefit Little Dresses for Africa, a Christian registered 501c3 nonprofit that sends dresses overseas to impoverished girls in Africa and beyond, including America.

It is reported in Africa that girls wearing a new little dress are much less likely to be abducted, abused, or molested because the new little dress shows that someone cares about them. 

Each dress takes four hours for Lillian to complete from start to finish, and it’s been her daily hobby for the past three years. To date, that has amounted to a whopping 855 dresses!

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Along with investing in her family, Weber said the dresses are now part of her life’s mission.  “I think that’s very important to have something different for these little girls,” she says. “I imagine four or five of them standing in a row, and they got a little dress on and they’re all different.”

“I feel the good Lord has given me this to do.” ~Lillian Weber

The people at Little Dresses for Africa, have named Lillian their ‘sewing celebrity.’ The organization has even launched a personal shipping fund for Lillian’s dresses.

“I never get tired of looking at them,” says Rachel O’Neill, founder and director of Little Dresses for Africa. “She likes to do the little extras, and believe me, [the little girls] love it.” O’Neill will personally deliver some of Lillian’s dresses to Malawi later this month.

“She’s my hero,” O’Neill says. “When someone like Lillian goes the extra mile, it shows.

Lillian’s daughters help by cutting out the fabric, and Lillian takes it the rest of the way. “She can thread a needle at 99; I can’t thread a needle and I’m not near that old,” said Linda Purcell, one of Weber’s daughters. “She makes the dresses because it helps her stay busy and staying busy keeps her out of a nursing home. She says she has no intention of slowing down or retiring.”

10 Ways To Make A Difference through Little Dresses For Africa.

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“If I’m still able to do it, I’ll continue all the way through because I know I’m making little girls happy. And that is very, very important to me.”
~Lillian Weber

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What a better place this sad world would be if all of us who were able-bodied said ‘No’ to retiring to the TV set or some other inwardly focused pastime and decided to re-tread to serve others. What a cool role model.

Lillian Weber is the kind of woman I want to be when I’m 99! 

“Our hearts of stone become hearts of flesh when we learn where the outcast weeps.” ~Brennan ManningAbba’s Child: The Cry of the Heart for Intimate Belonging

“This is how we know what love is: Jesus Christ laid down his life for us. And we ought to lay down our lives for our brothers.  If anyone has material possessions and sees his brother in need but has no pity on him, how can the love of God be in him?  Dear children, let us not love with words or tongue but with actions and in truth.” ~1 John 3: 16-18

If you are encouraged by something you have read here at Deep Roots, please consider liking my page on Facebookbut even more importantly, subscribing via Feedburner. Thank you so much!

Why 99-Year-Old Lillian Weber Is Not Retired, needy children, poor, ministry, pretty dresses, missional living, dedication, DIY, handmade, homemade, simple, easy, donate, sewing pattern, charity, Rachel O’Neill, stop abduction, stop abuse, 100th birthday, celebration, Little Dresses For Africa, sit in front of the TV, depression, selfishness, nonprofit 501c3, Christian, love, retirement, retiring, re-treading, centenarian, Lillian Weber, nursing home, aging, service, humanitarian, do unto others, Malawi, Africa, Brennan Manning, Abba's Child, book, quotes, shipping fund, role model, make a difference, sewing, pillowcase dress pattern, directions,

Deep Roots at Home is also now on Google+!

~ Jacqueline

Posted in Heroines and Heroes, Sewing, The Christian Walk, Tribute | 3 Comments

Murmuration~ Winter Spectacle

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Murmuration~ Winter Spectacle

A “murmuration” of starlings, as this phenomenon is known, must be one of the most magical, yet underrated, wildlife spectacles in winter. One writer says, “In murmuration, each bird strives to fly as close to its neighbors as possible, instantly copying any changes in speed or direction. As a result, tiny deviations by one bird are magnified and distorted by those surrounding it, creating rippling, swirling patterns.”

And whoever thought of the word murmuration, anyway? It comes from the Middle English – ‘the act of murmuring:  the utterance of low continuous sounds or complaining noises.’

You can experience them in the video.

Murmuration from Islands & Rivers on Vimeo.

These images were taken at Gretna on the Scottish borders on November 1, 2011. This brought tears to my eyes. As you watch this chance encounter with one of the Creator’s greatest and most fleeting displays, may your mind be renewed and your heart filled with a desire to praise our awesome God today!

Now I keep my eyes ever heavenward in late fall and winter hoping to witness this very cool event. Maybe you will be inspired by one this winter, too!

“For the beauty of the earth,
For the beauty of the skies,
For the love which from our birth
Over and around us lies,
Lord of all, to Thee we raise
This our grateful hymn of praise.”
~Words by Folliot S. Pierpoint, 1835-1917 The Song and the Story 
Queens College, Cambridge University

“I love to think of nature as an unlimited broadcasting station, through which God speaks to us every hour, if we will only tune in. ” ~George Washington Carver

If you are encouraged by something you have read here at Deep Roots, please consider liking my page on Facebookbut even more importantly, subscribing via Feedburner. Thank you so much!

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Deep Roots at Home is also now on Google+!

~ Jacqueline

Posted in Birds, Nature | 9 Comments

Developing Your Child’s Observation Skills

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Black swallowtail drying after emerging from chrysalis

Developing Your Children’s Observation Skills

As you work and play around your yard, have a camera at the ready and take pictures when you see something that might interest your young children, even if it isn’t interesting to you. It will sharpen their observation skills, useful for all of life.

For years, we have been on the ready to capture images of beautiful and unusual things on film and to study them. In this age of digital, it is so much easier. We stop what we are doing…we get all excited!

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Last week when my husband and I were working together on the blackberry patch behind the garden, I noticed a black swallowtail butterfly resting after coming out of its chrysalis.

I grabbed my compact camera, a Nikon S8100 Cool Pik, and began taking note of what I saw. This butterfly’s wings were still slightly wet and not yet full size. Notice the greenish tint to the veins in the wings.

This beautiful, but damp, adult had already emerged and was pumping a liquid called hemo-lymph into the veins to inflate the wings. At this time as they are very vulnerable to predators.

Host plants of the black swallowtail include members of the parsley family: carrot, parsley, dill, and Queen Anne’s lace. One of the reasons (besides food value) of growing dill and parsley annually is to witness the yearly attraction of the black swallowtail to our little potager. I see them floating above the plants many days right outside the kitchen window. As the summer progresses, you will most certainly find caterpillars.

You can construct a simple butterfly house and feed it fresh host plant every day; it is likely to make a chrysalis, and later emerge completing its life cycle.

Developing Your Children's Observation Skills, hemo-lymph, hatching, children, teaching, homeschooling, excitement, enthusiasm, nature lessons, outdoor fun, young children, parenting, motherhood, keeper at home, women's encouragement, photos, video, host plants, dill, parsley, carrot, bird hits window, rescue birds, crysalis, butterfly house, Oueen Anne's lace, bugle weed, life cycle of butterfly, S8100 Cool Pik Nikon camera, photography, observing nature, bird injury,

Probably 3-4 days out of the egg sack.

 

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Parsley going to seed in its second year. Time to re-sow.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This 1″ (young) caterpillar is on my parsley -  eating away. I have enough to spare for him and a few buddies :)

Developing Your Children's Observation Skills, hemo-lymph, hatching, children, teaching, homeschooling, excitement, enthusiasm, nature lessons, outdoor fun, young children, parenting, motherhood, keeper at home, women's encouragement, photos, video, host plants, dill, parsley, carrot, bird hits window, rescue birds, crysalis, butterfly house, Oueen Anne's lace, bugle weed, life cycle of butterfly, S8100 Cool Pik Nikon camera, photography, observing nature, bird injury,

These perfectly new wings are almost dry and full size

 

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I saw it happen! I heard it! This flash of yellow and a dull thump on the glass! A tiny little palm warbler dropped to the concrete of our back porch. Oh, it made my stomach churn, but I grabbed my camera and rushed out anyway to see if I could help. She just lay there, totally still, with her feet tucked up under her tummy. Her eyes rolled up and opened again. She was probably dazed and not afraid of me.

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Stunned palm warbler (thanks to Dawna for the ID)

It was a sunny, chilly, and very windy day. My daughter was right there beside me to hold the camera, and we took a 1 minute video to share. I will then tell you what happened.



After we set her down in a little hidden spot among the cobalt blue bugle weed, we watched off and on the whole afternoon and into chilly dusk. She became more alert, but didn’t fly away. The area of my garden is fenced, so there would be no threat of a cat, thankfully. In the morning our dear little friend had left. No sign of struggle, no feathers. She had shown signs of moving, so we decided to leave her in the hands of our Lord who knows…she would have certainly died in ours.

“Are not two sparrows sold for a penny? Yet not one of them will fall to the ground apart from the will of your Father.” ~Matthew 10: 29

Mamas, authentic excitement is catching! And truly, more is caught than taught…

It may be that you have a budding scientist (or nature writer or artist or photographer) in your home, and he or she may just need their eyes to be opened :) After all, that is half the pleasure and purpose of teaching our children…to direct them to excellent things, discover their God-given passions, and develop them to the fullest. Here are some practical ways to develop your child’s observation skills:

  • Take your children on walks in parks, on a nearby farm or orchard, or on your own property. Tell them that you want them to find 5 beautiful examples of God’s creation, such as an acorn, a leaf, a butterfly, a bird’s nest, or a plant. If possible, have your children draw what they found in a notebook and label it.
  • If you have older children, allow them time to use a camera to take photos of nature. You can help your child start and maintain a small photo journal of their finds.
  • If you come across some neat insect or plant while by yourself, take it and show your children. Ask them to help you identify it.
  • If you see a beautiful bird, scary snake, or other animal/insect, pull out an identification guide and look up the animal. Read about the creature, find out if it is poisonous, where it lives, its habitat and what it eats.
  • If you find unique things growing on a leaf or a small insect, grab your magnifying glass and show your children the intricacies of God’s creation.
  • Sometime when it’s snowing outside, put on gloves and let snowflakes fall into your hands. Take a magnifying glass and look at the design closely. Read more about the snowflake here.

Observing even the tiniest intricacies of nature builds in us a thankful attitude for the marvelous creation all around us, and it creates a mind eager and ready to observe in all areas of life.

If you are encouraged by something you have read here at Deep Roots, please consider liking my page on Facebook, but even more importantly, subscribing via Feedburner. Thank you!

Developing Your Children's Observation Skills, hemo-lymph, hatching, children, teaching, homeschooling, excitement, enthusiasm, nature lessons, outdoor fun, young children, parenting, motherhood, keeper at home, women's encouragement, photos, video, host plants, dill, parsley, carrot, bird hits window, rescue birds, crysalis, butterfly house, Oueen Anne's lace, bugle weed, life cycle of butterfly, S8100 Cool Pik Nikon camera, photography, observing nature, bird injury,

Deep Roots at Home is also now on Google+!

~ Jacqueline

Posted in Birds, Children, Garden, Home-schooling, Nature | 5 Comments

Can Leftovers Make You Sick?

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Can Leftovers Make You Sick?

Sometimes we think of the refrigerator as some sort of cryogenic chamber that’s capable of keeping food fresh indefinitely.                        

Stew from last week? No problem – it’s been in the fridge. Turkey slices left over from the pitch-in – what day was that, anyway? Leftover veggie pizza slices that got pushed to the back? Sure! But even at a chilly 40 degrees, mold and bacteria (both gram-positive and negative) can thrive. 

Two awful experiences with mold  - one in a past home and now this one – made us very sick! It is no joke, and now I have begun examining other places to be watching for mold. Even if you’ve never had the sickening, icky problem of mold to deal with, you may have not thought about it on or in your leftover food. But, you should!

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My practical friend Julie reminded me of this very thing since I mentioned we were eating more leftovers lately. Because of the sickness and clean-up from the latest mold issue and caring for the needs of two of our aging parents long-distance, I’ve not been as on top of things as I’d like. 

~ Jacqueline

Posted in Food & Recipes, Health, Healthy Living, Mealtime, Storing Food | 13 Comments

Perfect Coconut Pie Crust {Easy}

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Perfect Coconut Pie Crust {Easy}

This coconut pie crust recipe is soooo easy; it looks amazing when served and tastes amazing, too.  It has only two ingredients (magical words, right?).

As we prepare for sweet family times of Thanksgiving around the dinner table, I decided to think ahead about the pies I might want to make. To make a very pretty pie and to save some time for myself as well, I decided to do several pies this year with a coconut pie crust. This low carb, gluten-free crust will be helpful for family and friends watching ingredients, as well.

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Ingredients for the Crust:

  • 10-12 oz. shredded, UN-sweetened coconut will make one very thick and fluffy crust, as shown above. Just 8 oz. (1 bag) will make a thinner, normal crust suitable for coconut banana cream pie or other delightful concoction of your choice. Let’s Do Organic shredded coconut is very reasonable – $2.09/8 oz. bag – and leaves out the sugar. Many of the supermarkets carry it now in their baking aisle.
  • 4-6 TBSP. butter (preferably organic), softened

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Directions for the Crust:

1.) Preheat the oven to 350°F.

2.) Melt the butter on low in a small saucepan. In a medium-sized bowl, thoroughly mix the shredded coconut with the melted butter.

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3.) Place a 9-inch pie plate on a parchment-lined rimmed baking sheet. Press coconut mixture into bottom and up sides of pan to form crust, leaving top edges loose and fluffy. No need to grease the pie plate.

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 4.) Place a foil ring over the edges to prevent burning. Bake until center begins to brown, 10 to 15 minutes; remove foil and bake until edges are browned, 4 to 5 minutes more. Use your timer and set it for a couple of minutes less than you think you’ll need to brown. Keep an eye out from that point on and you can produce the perfectly browned, golden edge!

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Voila! A lovely golden brown that holds together under your filling!

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 A sweet-tart Key Lime Pie sounds like a fabulous finish to a rich Thanksgiving meal…what do you think?

Perfect Coconut Pie Crust {Easy}, food, holiday, celebration, gathering, hospitality, cooking, presentation, finish to the meal, sweet desserts, gourmet, homemade, homemaking, basic, gluten-free, shredded, unsweetened, key lime pie, Thanksgiving meal, Thanksgiving Day, rich meal, family table, mealtime, 2 ingredients, fluffy, healthy living, recipe, baking, holiday pies, festive, low carb, feast, baking,

(Creative Commons)

What’s your favorite pie to enjoy on Thanksgiving Day? 

If you are encouraged by something you have read here at Deep Roots, please consider liking my page on Facebook, but even more importantly, subscribing via Feedburner. Thank you!

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Deep Roots at Home is also now on Google+!

~ Jacqueline

Posted in Baking, Food & Recipes, Gluten-Free, Thanksgiving | 11 Comments

20 Safe Antibacterial and Antiviral Herbs {A Quick Guide}

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20 Safe Antibacterial and Antiviral Herbs {A Quick Guide}

20 Safe Antibacterial and Antiviral Herbs {A Quick Guide}, Rosemary Gladstar's Herbal Recipes for Vibrant Health: Teas, Tonics, Oils, Salves, Tinctures, and Other Natural Remedies for the Entire Family, gentle and effective, Melissa officinalis, Candida albicans, yeast infections, healthy living, essential oils, making tea, infusion, tincture, syrup, infused oil, topical use, gourmet cooking, thyme, oregano, cinnamon, cloves, echinacea, garlic, peppermint, ginger,  basil, dill, cilantro, tea tree, olive leaf, lemon balm, antiviral, antibacterial, anti-parasitic, anti-inflammatory, anti-fungal herbs, peppermint, usnea lichen, uva ursi, yarrow, astragalus, calendula, cranberry, cat's claw, mullein, elderberry, aromatic oils, dried herbs, herbal remedies, DIY, homemaking, recipes, home remedies, Herbs Hung to Dry in the rafters, pen and ink drawing

Early in my herbal adventures, I had a hunch that foods and medicines tinkered with and altered by man were riddled with problems and side-effects, but that things made by God were so much better when used properly.

It wasn’t until I had my own family, that I really discovered the worth and medicinal value of herbs and the truth of that conviction. After nursing for many years and seeing the downsides of pharmaceuticals, I saw it played out repeatedly.

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The first experience with the power of herbs came when I had a prolonged kidney/bladder infection, and I was reacting to the antibiotics. Usnea and uva ursi came to the rescue, and I’ve never gone back to the antibiotics. There was no need to!

With my family, I stuck to and made incredible use of the safe herbs (with research and prayer) that have been used for centuries, and you can, too! Maybe this list can set you on the path of discovery in treating viral (like ebola and West Nile) or bacterial infections.

Before using antibacterial or antiviral herbs, please understand I am not a doctor or an herbalist, but a mother practiced in the arts of natural health over the years. I suggest doing your own research, consulting an herbal medicine guide, or a reputable herbalist for exact dosing instructions. Every body is unique and so are your specific needs. Allow that there will likely be times when it is not wise to treat an illness that is beyond your capability.

Antibacterial Herbs, alphabetically:

Cinnamon (Cinnamomum sp.) has a preservative effect in food, retards bacterial growth, and has powerful antifungal properties to treat Candida albicans. It improves circulation, warms the body, and relieves discomfort in the abdomen. Whole cinnamon, taken in tea or tincture form, is an effective treatment for yeast infections that are resistant to treatment. It is useful as a treatment for thrush, an oral yeast infection. Use cinnamon as a tea, an essential oil, or add liberally to food. Always dilute cinnamon essential oil with a carrier oil to prevent stinging. 

Clove (Syzygium aromaticum) is a natural topical painkiller. Clove-infused oil or clove essential oil can also be used to temporarily treat a toothache or cold sore, relieve sore muscles and arthritis, treat upper respiratory infections, improve digestion, and kill bad bacteria in the gut. Always dilute clove essential oil in a carrier oil or olive oil to apply topically and use only a little as it is strong. Use EO in a personal steam inhaler or disperse via a room diffuser when mixed with other EOs. 

Echinacea (Echinacea augustifolia) has a historic reputation of boosting the immune system in treating colds and flu and fighting infections. It is known for its action to speed wound healing when taken at the beginning of an infection. Good anti-inflammatory properties. Use as a tea or tincture. Contraindicated in auto-immune diseases.

Garlic (Allium sativum) is a proven anti-fungal and antibacterial herb and more effective against several types of bacteria than penicillin. It does not cause bacteria to become resistant and destroys the offending invaders without killing the body’s normal good bacteria. Garlic can be used in a capsule, as a garlic tincture, garlic infused oil, or simply eat it raw (which is what we do when not going anywhere). Heating over 120 degrees will decrease its potency.

Peppermint (Mentha Piperita) The oil from this plant has a soothing effect on coughs and helps clear congestion to make breathing easier.  It can also help build a stronger immune system and has both anti-microbial and antioxidant qualities. Effective for gas, bloating and nausea, morning sickness and stomach cramps. Additionally, it can help ease the symptoms of Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Peppermint is a muscle relaxer and reduces monthly cramps. Excellent for all sorts of minor pain relief due to its menthol content. It heightens alertness if drowsy. It’s my favorite breath freshener. Use the dried herb as a tea, the essential oil in a room diffuser or personal steam inhaler, or chew the leaves.

Tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) is an Australia native whose essential oil acts as a potent antimicrobial agent. Helpful for fungal nail infections, acne, and athletes foot. Studies show that it’s active against the yeast Candida albicans, and bacteria such as staph (Staphylococcus aureus). In lab studies, tea tree oil kills methacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Some, but not all, studies in humans show that topical applications can eliminate colonization of the bacteria in skin and nose. Use as an essential oil topically with a carrier oil, in hand soap, or in a room diffuser. Not to be taken internally.

Thyme (Thymus) is a strong antibacterial agent as well as a strong antiseptic and antioxidant. The oil can be used within mouthwashes in order treat mouth inflammations as well as infections of the throat. Thyme contains bronchial antispasmodic and expectorant properties useful in bronchitis, upper respiratory tract inflammation, and whooping cough. All members of the family of mint, such as thyme, contain terpenoids that are well-known for battling cancer. Use dried herb as a tea, as a powerful household cleaner, or use as an essential oil. EO not for use with young children.

Usnea (Usnea barbata) for 25 years, when combined with Uva Ursi (below), this is my favorite go-to for bladder and kidney infections. This common lichen is antibacterial and antifungal. A powerful antibiotic, usnea is used to treat urinary tract infections, strep and staph infections, respiratory and sinus infections as well as fungal infections like vaginal yeast and Candida albicans. Usnea is best used as a tincture. No known precautions, but consult an herbalist before using in pregnancy.

Uva Ursi (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi) is often used as a tincture or capsule for treating urinary tract infections as it contains compounds effective at killing pathogens specific to the urinary tract. Because of its strength, it should not be used continually for longer than 2 weeks. Not to be used by children, pregnant, or nursing women or those with kidney disease.

Yarrow (Achillea millefolium) The fresh leaves can be used to staunch bleeding wounds and to relieve tooth aches and canker sores when chewed. It is antibacterial and anti-inflammatory, useful for increasing bile flow (releasing toxins), eczema, fighting fevers, lessening menstrual bleeding and cramps, and increasing circulation. As a tea, yarrow is used to fight urinary tract infections. It can cause uterine contractions, so avoid during pregnancy. 

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Antiviral Herbs, alphabetically:

Astragalus root (Astragalus membranaceus) is an excellent antiviral herb that works to boost the immune system much like dandelion or burdock. Taken internally, either brewed as a tea, in a tincture, in a capsule, or by adding it to stew, astragalus root is known to increase your body’s defense against viruses. Astragalus root is best used as prevention, so take it during flu season or before going places with large crowds of people. Avoid if you already have a fever.

Calendula (Calendula officinalis) is a wound-healing, anti-inflammatory, and skin-soothing botanical. It is most often used topically for cuts, abrasions, skin infections, insect bites, and to treat pink eye. Calendula is antifungal and so can help to cure thrush (Candida albicans). As salve, it is great for chapped lips, facial cream, and diaper rash. You can use calendula as an infusion (tea), tincture, lotion, or salve. There are no known precautions.

Cat’s Claw (Uncaria tomentosa) In addition to being antiviral, cat’s claw is antifungal, anti-parasitic, and antiviral herb , cat’s claw is also known for boosting the immune system, increasing your body’s protection against illness. Cat’s claw can be taken as a tea, tincture, or capsule. Do not take during pregnancy or while nursing baby.

Cinnamon (Cinnamomum sp.) - see above.

Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) is a potent defense against urinary tract infections due to its ability to make the bladder lining too “slippery” to adhere to. Full of antioxidants, cranberry also has antiviral properties and prevents plaque formation on teeth. Use capsules (Cranactin) or as concentrated juice (best with no sugar added).

Elderberry (Sambucus nigra) has antiviral activity against cold and flu viruses and enhances immune function. Elderberry stimulates circulation and effectively cleanses the body. Elderberry tincture and elderberry syrup (easy to make) are the common delivery methods. Leaves, roots, seeds, and berries of the raw plant contain cyanide-producing compounds and should not be consumed without proper preparation.

Ginger (Zingiber officinale) is another herb known for its antiviral and antibacterial properties. It is well known as a remedy for travel sickness, nausea and indigestion, colic, irritable bowel, chills, cold, flu, poor circulation, menstrual cramps, and gas. Ginger is a powerful anti-inflammatory herb helpful for joint problems and arthritis. It has also been used to lower cholesterol and blood-pressure and aid in preventing internal blood clots. Ginger can be taken as a tea (Ginger Aid), in capsule form, as an essential oil, or added liberally to foods. A tea brew that begs the wind to howl and the snow to fall while you cozy up with it.

Lemon Balm (Melissa officinalis) In Germany, the antiviral effects of lemon balm are well-documented, and creams made from the herb are prescribed for herpes outbreaks and cold sores. Lemon balm is very easy to grow in your garden – a little too easy, in fact, as it tends to take over if not contained. Lemon balm makes a very good tea, and can be drunk to combat all sorts of viral infections, such as colds and flu. The tea or a cream can be applied to cold sores or other viral lesions, such as shingles or chickenpox. May be unsafe to consume during pregnancy.

Mullein (Verbascum thapsus) is one of my favorite herbs. It is wonderful for breaking up chest and sinus congestion. Best taken as a hot tea with peppermint. Also, mullein-infused oil is a great remedy for ear infection especially when combined with garlic. Use the mullein flowers to create an infused oil. 

Olive Leaf (Olea europaea) As antiviral herbs, olive leaf is used to treat the flu, common cold and herpes. Olive leaf can be taken as a tincture, capsule, or tea mixed with mint. Avoid during pregnancy.

Oregano (Origanum vulgare) Way beyond adding great flavor to food, oregano fights viruses and bacteria as one of the best and strongest antiviral herbs available and may help in the fight against antibiotic resistance. I believe it is effective for treatment of psoriasis along (with milk thistle) because of what it did to rid my father of his horrible 20-year case.  It should be avoided in infants and children, and pregnant or nursing women. I add Super Strength P73 oil to gelatin capsules. Not for prolonged use.

Disclaimer: I am not a professional nor a doctor. I do seek scientific confirmation of the safety and effectiveness of the herbs and remedies I use. Using remedies is a personal decision. Nothing I say on this blog is intended to treat or prevent disease. These are just a few of the many antibacterial and antiviral herbs. I do encourage you to take control of your health through self-study and teach your children, if you haven’t already. This is a very helpful, fun, and easily readable book on this topic: Rosemary Gladstar’s Herbal Recipes for Vibrant Health: 175 Teas, Tonics, Oils, Salves, Tinctures, and Other Natural Remedies for the Entire Family.

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Do Take Control of your Health! Bulk Herb Store has a great page of Basic Ways to Use many of these Herbs here.

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(I do have an affiliate standing with Bulk Herb Store and Mountain Rose Herbs. If you need a source of pure, organic herbals, books, or accessories to make your own wonderful recipes, I would be grateful if you would purchase through the link or the buttons in this post. It helps to support Deep Roots At Home. Thank you!)

Do you have a favorite herb?

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~ Jacqueline

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God Is Not Dead In US Marine Corps

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God Is Not Dead In US Marine Corps

Despite first amendment challenges and religious persecution taking place almost daily across the US, we still have assurance that Jehovah God is very much alive and active.  Scripture affirms God is at work in mighty ways everywhere – omnipresent, omniscient and omnipresent – in schools, business, sports, communities, Hollywood, and in our military. 

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Please prayer for all of our brave young men and women in uniform. Also, pray for the intrepid chaplains that are boldly sharing the truth in the Word of God with them. As you know, the God of the Holy Bible is systematically being stripped out of our military, not just the Marine Corps – all branches are under attack. Just last week the “So help me God” requirement in Air Force oaths was removed.

While this video is encouraging news and a comfort, let’s be constant in prayer for those who in uniform who don’t know the Lord Jesus. These are frightening times. I am thankful He is at work in every circumstance whether home or abroad.  

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Sweet Hour of Prayer by Emily Pugmire

There are no atheists in foxholes.” ~often attributed to U. S. Military Chaplain William Thomas Cummings in a field sermon during the Battle of Bataan in 1942.

“God will not permit any troubles to come upon us, unless He has a specific plan by which great blessing can come out of the difficulty.” ~Peter Marshall, U.S. Senate Chaplain, 1946-48

If you are encouraged by something you have read here at Deep Roots, please consider liking my page on Facebookbut even more importantly, subscribing via Feedburner. Thank you!

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~ Jacqueline

Posted in Heroines and Heroes, Prayer, The Christian Walk | 6 Comments

Egg-in-the-Basket ~A Cheery Breakfast

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Egg-in-the-Basket ~A Cheery Breakfast

When the new day dawns with its glorious array of sunbeams and there’s lots to be done, it helps to have a cheerful breakfast to awaken the sleepyheads. We can’t perform to our peak capacity when we don’t begin each day with a healthy and hearty breakfast. ‘Egg-in-the-basket’ is one of our favorites. Continue reading

Egg-in-the-Basket ~A Cheery Breakfast, photos, sunrise, sunset, waking up, a new day, quick meal, planning, sleepyheads, pastured eggs, sprouted grain bread, Ezekiel Bread, prayer at mealtime, Food For Life, asking the blessing, saying grace, Good Morning!, frittata, omelet, cast iron skillet, cleaning, cast iron, sun's rays, fiery skyI can’t say enough good about my cast iron skillet. It makes the best omelet, frittata, or eggs I’ve ever tasted. French toast is perfect flipped on the shiny, hot surface. Eggs just do so well on cast iron.

We gave up our aluminum and ‘non-stick surface’ skillets after reading about transference of chemicals to our food. At the time, I was apprehensive. I had never cooked with cast iron, but I found not only does it save cleaning time, but it is healthier, and eggs and omelets practically slide out of the skillet when ready.

We have not washed our cast iron with soap for over a year. There is no need unless you stop using it for a period of time and wish to store it. The photo below was taken after making French toast and removing it with a metal spatula. If there are a few fragments of cooked egg, I wipe them off with a paper towel and store the skillet in the oven. It is still very hot when I place it there to wait for the next use, likely the next day.

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To fix this fun and cheerful breakfast presentation is very easy.

You will need:

  • 1 egg per each slice of bread (we use Ezekiel 4: 9 sprouted grain bread)
  • oil (coconut oil is delicious for this; other oils are altered by high heat)
  • a hot cast iron skillet

Next:

Simply take a slice of bread of your choice and use a round cookie cutter or the top of a juice glass to make a hole. Save the cut-out to dip in the soft yolk or in honey:)

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While you are preparing the bread slices, melt 1 TBSP of coconut oil in your skillet and heat it to where an egg will fry. The bread ( and the hole you saved) will absorb the oil and become crispy and nicely browned. If you’ve ever had fried bread, this will bring back delightful memories.

Crack a golden-yolked egg into the ‘basket’, let fry, and flip with a metal spatula until both sides are just right. If you like your yolk cooked, this is the time to break the yolk. Add a bit of sea salt and pepper, if desired. Serve with sliced fruit and a big glass of raw milk. 

Mm Hmm…egg-in-the-basket.

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With a 14 or 16″ cast iron skillet you can make 2 or 3 egg-in-the-basket at one time. This would be a great meal skill to teach to your younger children. Demonstrating and allowing him or her to help the first two or three times will allay any fears and you will be able to slowly work yourself out of a job!

Getting off to an early start is especially helpful during the younger school years, setting the tone for later years when the rigors of academia can be pressing. It gets everyone in the groove to being productive early in the morning, and there can be much accomplished by noon. As progress is made, it tends to build confidence that you can go the distance.

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So much is accomplished at mealtime~ it is the best time to communicate, plan ahead, relieve stress, build camaraderie, and laugh together. It is one of the major things to which I can attribute our family closeness.

Remember to thank the Giver of all life and good things. We are so blessed to have each other, food, and a safe home. May we never take the Lord and His benefits for granted.

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 “Let them thank the Lord for his steadfast love,
    for his wondrous works to the children of man!” ~ Psalm 107: 15

If you are encouraged by something you have read here at Deep Roots, please consider liking my page on Facebookbut even more importantly, subscribing via Feedburner. Thank you!

Egg-in-the-Basket ~A Cheery Breakfast, photos, sunrise, sunset, waking up, a new day, quick meal, planning, sleepyheads, pastured eggs, sprouted grain bread, Ezekiel Bread, prayer at mealtime, Food For Life, asking the blessing, saying grace, Good Morning!, frittata, omelet, cast iron skillet, cleaning, cast iron,

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~ Jacqueline

Posted in Encouragement for Mothers, Food & Recipes, Mealtime, Tutorial | 13 Comments

What Babies Learn In the Womb

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What Babies Learn in the Womb

As a 14-year infertility patient, I had a high desire to connect with the lives growing in my belly. We knew we had conceived on day 18 of that GIFT procedure, thanks to that first scheduled ultrasound, and we marveled at the flutter of two newly-formed beating hearts in what many call a ‘blob of tissue’. Long before my baby bump showed off the precious miracle, I prayed for, patted, sang and read to our little twins. But unknown to me at the time, what was happening inside my belly was more even miraculous than I could fathom! 

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What Babies Learn In the Womb, second trimester, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, beating hearts, blob of tissue, abortion kills, Psalm 139, 13-14, pro-life, in utero, food preferences, dreaming in the womb, dreams, nursing, mother, neonatal researchers, kangaroo care, skin on skin for baby, mother's voice, pregnancy, Marshall Klaus, M.D., author, book, baby, Your Amazing Newborn. infertility, ultrasound, amniocentesis, GIFT procedure, third trimester, infant memory, fetuses can hear, suck, grasp, feel pain, suck thumb or fingers, kick, push, play with umbilical cord, learn language, mothering, parenting, infant development, attachment, bonding, voice recognition, William Fifer, Ph.D., pediatrics, Columbia University's College of Physicians and Surgeons. photography of life before birth, conception, pro-choice, planned parenthood,

Now we know so much more according to Laura McCarthy of Parenting Magazine:

The first time I played my acoustic guitar for my son, Michael, he was just a few months old. But even though the only other occasions he could have heard me play was when I was pregnant with him, he turned around and gave me a smile that seemed to say, “I recognize that sound!” Was it possible that he was remembering what he’d heard in the womb?

For years, doctors assumed that babies were born without any knowledge about the outside world. But recent research is questioning this assumption, offering clues to what babies comprehend in utero, what they remember after they’re born, and how that information prepares them for the world outside the womb. Today, doctors realize that babies begin to engage many of their senses and to learn about the world around them during the last trimester of pregnancy—and maybe even before. 

What’s that Noise?

The uterus isn’t exactly the quietest place to hang out. Not only can a baby hear the sounds of his mom’s body—her stomach growling, her heart beating, the occasional hiccup or burp—but he can also hear noises from beyond. If mom sits in a movie theater with state-of-the-art sound or walks by a noisy construction site, odds are the fetus will react to all the ruckus by kicking or shifting around.

Of course, not all sounds are the same. Perhaps the most significant one a baby hears in utero is his mother’s voice. Around the seventh and eighth month, a fetus’s heart rate slows down slightly whenever his mother is speaking, indicating that mom’s voice has a calming effect.

By the time they’re born, babies can actually recognize their mother’s voice. In one study, doctors gave day-old infants pacifiers that were connected to tape recorders. Depending on the babies’ sucking patterns, the pacifiers either turned on a tape of their mother’s voice or that of an unfamiliar woman’s voice. The amazing result: “Within 10 to 20 minutes, the babies learned to adjust their sucking rate on the pacifier to turn on their own mother’s voice,” says the study’s coauthor William Fifer, Ph.D., an associate professor of psychiatry and pediatrics at Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons. “This not only points out a newborn’s innate love for his mother’s voice but also a baby’s unique ability to learn quickly.”

Interestingly, there is no evidence that newborns show a similar preference for their father’s or siblings’ voices, or for any other voices they may have heard frequently while in the uterus. “The difference could be that the maternal voice is communicated to the fetus in two ways: as ambient sound through the abdomen and internally through the vibration of vocal chords,” says Janet DiPietro, Ph.D., a developmental psychologist at Johns Hopkins University. “In contrast, external voices and other noises are only heard as ambient sounds.”

In fact, research has shown that if newborns are given a choice, they prefer the version of mom’s voice that sounds closest to what they heard in the womb. “In studies where we gave day-old babies a choice of hearing their mother’s voice filtered to sound as it did in utero—muffled and low—or as it does outside of the womb, they showed a distinct preference for the filtered voice,” says Fifer.

An Ear for Language

Muffled or not, unborn babies seem to develop a fine ear for certain sounds. Research reveals that babies had their first lessons in their native language while still in utero. They’ll suck more vigorously to turn on tape recordings of people speaking in the language of their mothers, rather than in a foreign tongue. Of course, it’s likely the babies are picking up on the rhythm and melody of the speech, rather than individual words.

This doesn’t mean that moms need to converse directly to their swelling belly to give their child a head start on language, however. A developing fetus gets all the information he needs just by listening in on his mother’s conversations with others. He also may be picking up something from any books she reads aloud. Besides being able to tell the difference between English and French, a study shows that babies in the womb may be able to recognize the specific rhythms and patterns of the stories they hear. Pregnant women read out loud one of two stories—The Cat in the Hat or The King, the Mice, and the Cheese—twice a day for six weeks before they delivered their babies. After birth, when the infants were three days old, they were played tape recordings of unfamiliar voices reading those stories: They consistently changed their sucking patterns on the pacifiers to hear the story they’d heard in utero.

Seeing the Light

Since there’s no such thing as a womb with a view, it’s no great loss that a baby’s eyes, which form in the first trimester, are sealed shut until about the seventh month. After they open, the fetus is able to see, but there’s little or no light to see anything by. Some doctors have reported, however, that if you shine a very bright light up inside the uterus, the fetus will turn away from it. Similarly, doctors suspect that the fetus may be able to detect a faint glow if a strong light is pointed right at mom’s belly. Ultrasound has also revealed that fetuses gradually open and close their eyes more and more as they near delivery, as if practicing for blinking and seeing in the outside world.

Discriminating Tastes

A pregnant woman really is eating for two, and the quality of what she eats matters as much as the quantity. Taste buds develop in a fetus around the seventh or eighth week and, by week 14, there is some evidence to suggest he can taste bitter, sweet, or sour flavors in the amniotic fluid. As with his other senses, he uses taste to explore the womb around him. Ultrasounds have even shown that fetuses lick the placenta and uterine wall.

Studies indicate that the flavors and aromas of the foods mom eats during pregnancy, which pass through to her amniotic fluid, may affect her baby’s taste preferences long after birth. “The more varied a mother’s diet during pregnancy and breastfeeding, the more likely that the infant will accept a new food,” says Julie Mennella, Ph.D., biopsychologist at the Monell Chemical Senses Center, in Philadelphia. Studies have also found that breastfed babies are more willing than those who were formula-fed to consume a new food when they get older. “This could be because they’ve learned to accept the many different flavors that have passed through the mother’s digestive system to her breast milk,” says Mennella.

A Nose for Mom

An unborn baby not only tastes foods, but can smell them as well. Doctors have noted that, at birth, amniotic fluid sometimes carries the scent of cumin, garlic, fennel, and other spices a mother has eaten while pregnant. Amniotic fluid, which babies swallow and breathe in during their time in utero, not only has the smells of the foods mom eats, but of mom herself.

That, in fact, may be how newborns recognize their mothers. “It’s possible that in the first few hours after birth, a baby’s sense of smell may be more important in helping him identify his mother than his vision is,” says Mennella. In fact, studies have shown that if a mother washes just one breast right after birth, the baby will prefer to nurse at the other, unwashed breast. (This is why some doctors advise new mothers not to shower until at least after the first feeding—to allow their natural aroma to help establish breastfeeding.)

Perchance, to Dream?

Through ultrasound tests, researchers have seen evidence that babies in utero experience rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, which is associated with dreaming, at around 32 to 36 weeks. No one knows whether they’re actually dreaming, since their brain waves can’t yet be monitored, but doctors believe that it’s certainly possible.

In fact, the sleep patterns of fetuses in this stage of development closely resemble those of newborns: They spend a lot of their time in REM sleep, but also in a quiet, deep sleep where there is no eye movement. Researchers have also observed babies in utero in a state of quiet alertness, which suggests they may be concentrating on something—listening to mom talking, perhaps.

Ready for the Big World

Babies eagerly investigate whatever they can get their hands on—and the fun starts before birth. As early as 20 weeks, fetuses react to what’s around them. (Ultrasounds have shown that some try to grasp the amniocentesis needle when it’s inserted into the uterus.) But it isn’t until the third trimester that they really begin to grow curious about their intrauterine world. Though there isn’t a whole lot in there to play with, fetuses entertain themselves by sucking on their hands and fingers (especially their thumb, which they discover at about 18 weeks). They also ‘walk’ around by pushing on the uterine walls with their feet, and yank, pull, and swing their umbilical cord—they even practice breathing.

All this playing around helps them develop important reflexes they’ll need once they’re born. Sucking will not only be crucial to taking in food but will also be a source of comfort. And feeling things with their mouth is an important way for babies to explore things. Filling their lungs and moving the diaphragm up and down—albeit with fluid instead of oxygen—is also good practice; by the time the baby makes his entrance into the world, he will have learned to breathe on his own.

Doctors believe that pushing off the uterine wall probably helps the fetus develop the ability to reach his mother’s breast soon after birth. When a newborn baby is placed on his mother’s bare abdomen, his primal instinct starts to kick in: Within the first hour of life, he’ll push his way up toward his mother’s breast, guided mostly by scent, according to research by Marshall Klaus, M.D., author of Your Amazing Newborn.

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So compelling is the research on this early dance between mother and baby that Dr. Klaus and other neonatal researchers are now urging hospitals to change their procedure for handling newborns: Instead of weighing and bathing the infant right after delivery, they suggest placing him between the mother’s breasts immediately after an initial examination and waiting at least an hour after birth to perform any necessary procedures.

All this goes to show that a baby isn’t just passively waiting to be born while in the womb. He’s already building important skills and developing a strong bond with one of the most important people in his life—his mother.

Excerpt written by Laura Flynn McCarthy. She is a New Hampshire-based freelance writer who specializes in health and parenting issues. She is also the mother of two boys.

So now I understand the depth of these words spoken to me separately by two of our three living children: “Mommie, I just love your smell!” What a treasured memory to hold forever in your heart.

Do you have a story you can share here?

“For You formed my inward parts; You wove me in my mother’s womb. I will give thanks to You, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made; Wonderful are Your works, And my soul knows it very well.” ~Psalm 139: 13-14

 ~~~

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~ Jacqueline

Posted in Encouragement for Mothers, Health, Motherhood, Parenting, Pregnancy and Breastfeeding | 16 Comments

My Version Of Purification® Essential Oil Blend

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My Version Of Purification® Essential Oil Blend

In the spirit of the do-it-yourself-er and as a salute to the ‘too-frugal-to-buy-it-already-made’, here is how to make my version of Young Living’s Purification® blend. Their blend is very nice, but I believe I can achieve a finished product that is just as excellent and save money, too. I call my version ‘Clean and Fresh’.

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TheraPro premium diffuser

This is simply a blend of essential oils that are known for their specific properties. Anyone willing to research and learn more can make an excellent alternative if you know the properties you desire and a general ratio for mixing. For this one, think ‘disinfection’.

The Properties:

Lemon‘s benefits - antibacterial, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antirheumatic, anti-malarial, antiparasitic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, astringent, carminative, detoxifying, digestive, diuretic, laxative, calming, yet stimulating. Uses include: purifying properties in kitchen, bath, and sickroom when used in a diffuser or in a disinfectant blend; ability to treat stress disorders, infections, asthma, obesity, insomnia, skin disorders, hair conditions, stomach problems, and tiredness. Uplifting, focusing, and happy.

Rosemary‘s benefits - analgesic, anti-arthritic, antibacterial, antioxidant, anti-parasitic, antiseptic, astringent, decongestant, digestive, diuretic, expectorant, fungicidal, hepatic, restorative, stimulant, tonic. Uses include: calms stress, but stimulates the mind and reflexes, improves memory; fights headaches, migraines, mental fatigue; improves intestinal infections, eases colitis, gas, liver disorders and jaundice; relieves muscle and joint pain; helps arteriosclerosis, palpitations, poor circulation, and varicose veins; reduces water retention during menstruation; easing congestion in asthma, bronchitis, sinus and whooping cough; encourages hair growth, helpful with acne, dermatitis and eczema, affects the health of the hair and scalp. 

Lavender‘s benefits - analgesic, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antiseptic, antispasmodic, aromatic, deodorant, diuretic, insecticide, sedative, stimulant. Uses include: calming; safe sleep aid; all manners of pain control; regenerates tissues; stops itching and reduces swelling of insect bites and bee stings; works wonders for minor and first degree burns and sunburn to heal fast; reduces scarring; stops bleeding, cleans wounds and kills bacteria in cuts; use topically on eczema and dermatitis; alleviates the symptoms of motion sickness; helps alleviate the symptoms of hay fever and many airborne allergies. Many more too numerous to mention here.

Tea Tree‘s benefits - analgesic, antibacterial, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antiparasitic, antiseptic, antiviral, decongestant, deodorant, expectorant, fungicidal, immune stimulant, insecticide. Uses include:  a wonderful toothpaste and mouthwash ingredient; heals cold sores/herpes; freshens laundry; treats ringworm; a topical pain reliever; effective on lice; eliminates your dog’s fleas; an effective whole room airborne disinfectant if used in a diffuser or homemade household cleaner; rids of fungus and fungal infections if persistent; soothes cuts, wounds, and minor burns; helps diaper rash and eczema and psoriasis, acne, and more.

The Essential Oil Ingredients:

25 drops lemon essential oil
20 drops rosemary essential oil
20 drops tea tree (aka melaleuca) essential oil
15 drops lavender essential oil

Mix all essential oils together in a dark glass bottle for use in many applications.

The above recipe makes a lovely blend and does not need to be exact; this is just what I do and I like these proportions. Other essential oils that are disinfectant and anti-insect in nature are cloveslemongrass, citronella, lemon balm, and elemi (‘poor man’s frankincense’) among others.

How to use:

Diffuse the blend into a sickroom for 15 to 30 minutes every 3 to 4 hours

Add 3-5 drops to your laundry wash cycle – non-staining

Add 2-3 drops of the blend into nebulizer or a pan of simmering water on the stove to neutralize smell of pets, stale smoke and kitchen smells 

Add 10-15 drops to 32 oz of water and apply in a spray application to disinfect and cleanse surfaces and freshen face and neck on a hot day or sheets

Mix 3-5 drops in a 1/2 tsp. carrier oil and apply to skin or bandaid

Put on cotton balls in air vents for purifying total room air and repelling insects at home or at work

Caution: NOT to be taken by mouth as tea tree is not for internal use. Keep all essential oils out of reach of children.

The Cost:

Remember, there are 300 drops in 1/2 oz. You can make a lot of batches with this small stash:

1/2 oz. lemon ess. oil is $5.50.
1/2 oz. rosemary ess. oil is $5.25.
1/2 oz. lavender is $10.25, (1 full oz. is only $11.70 while on sale – only $1.45 more for twice as much!!)
1/2 oz. tea tree is $5.75.

Purchased from Young Living, the customer price for one bottle (1/2 oz.) of Purification® is $24.67.

Total for 4 essential (1/2 oz.) MRH oils to make many bottles of my version = $26.75. That is $2.00 more for 4 times more volume of oils. Also, the oils individually have many other valuable uses besides antimicrobial disinfection in a prepper’s medicine chest. 

Do the math!

Since I’m always interested in being My Version Of Purification® Essential Oil Blend, Fresh and Clean, aromatherapy, drug resistance, Jean Valnet, DIY, M.D., pet odors, Mountain Rose Herbs, storing EOs, research, save money, sale, blends, citronella, lemon balm, and elemi, poor man's frankincense, anti-parasitic, fungicidal, preparedness minded, bird flu, epidemic, colds and flu season, sickroom, spray cleaner, carrier oil, deodorant, insecticide, deters pests, recipe, nebulizer, topical, analgesic, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antiseptic, antispasmodic, aromatic, deodorant, diuretic, insecticide, sedative, stimulant, eucalyptus, healthy living, natural medicine chest, tea tree, lemon, lemongrass, lavender, rosemary, TheraPro premium diffuser, disinfectant spray, homemade cleaners, Thieve's, antiviral, antifungal, prepared for any difficult eventuality when we might not have medical care such as a flu outbreak or epidemic, I was happy to learn that essential oils keep for many years when tightly sealed and stored in an amber or cobalt glass bottle in a cool, dark place.

I have used essential oils for many years (even before they were popular) and am familiar with many of the companies out there; I have grown to trust and love Mountain Rose Herbs essential oils. 

Right now, we are using my favorite diffuser to kill the last traces of mold; we had to cut out wet, moldy drywall in our bedroom after a leak from a shower in an adjoining room. I am so thankful to be able to use my own ‘Robber’ blend, based on YL’s Thieves ®. It really kills mold!

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Safety of many EOs:

Many essential oils are tremendously antibacterial, anti-infectious, and antiseptic, yet completely harmless to healthy tissue. In fact, in most cases, they are highly beneficial to healthy tissue – a rare combination. Also, bacterial cannot outsmart essential oils and develop resistance.

Jean Valnet, M.D., who studied essential oils in France and employed therapeutic essential oils in battlefield situations as he practiced surgery during World War II, was the first to establish dosages of essential oils for therapeutic use. He emphasized their antimicrobial and beneficial properties:

“Essential oils are especially valuable as antiseptics because their aggression toward microbial germs is matched by their total harmlessness toward tissue.”

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Disclaimer: I am not a professional, nor a doctor. I do seek scientific confirmation of the safety and effectiveness of the herbs and remedies I use. Using remedies is a personal decision. Nothing I say on this blog is intended to treat or prevent disease.
The links provided here on Deep Roots At Home are only for products that I use and trust. I would gladly write about what our family uses even without the links, but many ask about the products, so for ease, I will try to always include them. This is not a true profit center for me, but the little bit I can earn does help with costs of writing a blog intended to help build up families.  I am disclosing this in accordance with 16 CFR, Part 255 and humbly thank you for your support.

If you are encouraged by something you have read here at Deep Roots, please consider liking my page on Facebookbut even more importantly, subscribing via Feedburner

My Version Of Purification® Essential Oil Blend, Fresh and Clean, aromatherapy, drug resistance, Jean Valnet, DIY, M.D., pet odors, Mountain Rose Herbs, storing EOs, research, save money, sale, blends, citronella, lemon balm, and elemi, poor man's frankincense, anti-parasitic, fungicidal, preparedness minded, bird flu, epidemic, colds and flu season, sickroom, spray cleaner, carrier oil, deodorant, insecticide, deters pests, recipe, nebulizer, topical, analgesic, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antiseptic, antispasmodic, aromatic, deodorant, diuretic, insecticide, sedative, stimulant, eucalyptus, healthy living, natural medicine chest, tea tree, lemon, lemongrass, lavender, rosemary, TheraPro premium diffuser, disinfectant spray, homemade cleaners, Thieve's, antiviral, antifungal,

Deep Roots at Home is also now on Google+!

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~ Jacqueline

Posted in DIY, Essential Oils, Favorite Products, Health, Herbal Remedies | 24 Comments